Author Archives: Wendell Evans

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Associate Professor Wendell Evans


Wendell Evans Chairs the Australian Chapter of the Alliance for a Cavity Free Future. He is the Honorary Colgate Associate Professor at Sydney Dental School, University of Sydney. Formerly, Wendell directed the cariology and preventive dentistry program at Sydney Dental School where the central focus is on non-surgical management of the initial non-cavitated white spot lesions of dental caries. This work evolved as part of curriculum development in cariology. He led a team that developed the “Caries Management System” (CMS) protocol. The system was first tested on very high-risk patients attending the Westmead Centre for Oral Health. The next step was to introduce the CMS to general dental practice, the Monitor Dental Practice Program. This was implemented in a National Health and Medical Research Council (NHMRC) funded multi-centre randomised controlled trial. The results demonstrated the cost effectiveness of the CMS protocols in reducing the need for surgical interventions and included an economic analysis, which projected the effect over the life-time of the patients in the intervention arm of the study. Further NHMRC funding was obtained (i) to assess the sustainability of the intervention post-trial, (ii) to validate the economic modeling, and (iii) to gather qualitative data on the process of implementing the CMS protocol in general practice. The findings at 7 years indicated that the earlier outcomes were sustained; patients at the intervention practices needed around 50% fewer restorations compared with patients attending the control practices. Wendell is a past-president of the ANZ Division, International Association for Dental Research (IADR) and for a 3-year period was the IADR Asia-Pacific Regional Board Member.

Recent articles by Associate Professor Wendell Evans

Oral Care and Health for Kids

Practical Parenting

1. How common is tooth decay in young Australian children? Tooth decay is the most common serious childhood disease. By age 5 years, 42% of Australian children have one or more teeth with holes (cavities), or fillings, or teeth that...

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